For-Profit Fraud Ohio Virtual Charter Schools

Jan Resseger: Will the Ohio Legislature Have the Courage to Reign in Politically Powerful ECOT?

Interesting essay samples and examples on: https://essays.io/dissertation-examples-samples/

Jan Resseger writes here about the fate of legislation that would establish accountability for the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT), which is the worst performing school in the state and is owned by one of the biggest donors to Republican politicians.

ECOT has a bad habit of claiming tuition for students who are theoretically enrolled but never turn on their computer. There apparently are thousands of phantom students. The state has attempted to claw back millions of dollars from ECOT but ECOT has fought them in court.

Can William Lager, owner of ECOT, ever be held accountable for his collection of hundreds of millions of dollars from Ohio taxpayers? It will be settled in court. Unfortunately, Lager has contributed to the campaigns of several judges on Ohio’s Supreme Court.

The law needs fixing, to protect students and taxpayers:

Ohio State Senator Joe Schiavoni ought to be a hero to public school teachers and parents—and to citizens who support responsible stewardship of tax dollars. Except that thanks to the power of the Republican leadership in the Ohio legislature, few people are really aware of Schiavoni’s heroic effort to put a stop to Bill Lager’s massive scam—the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow.

Schiavoni is a Democrat and his bill to regulate online charter schools has been pushed aside for over a year now. As Schiavoni explained in testimony last February, “Senate Bill 39 is the updated version of Senate Bill 298 from the last General Assembly.” In March of 2016, Schiavoni first introduced a version of this bill—designed to reign in Bill Lager’s giant scam. ECOT was (and still is) charging the state, which pays charter schools on a per pupil basis, for students who have enrolled at ECOT but are not regularly logging onto their computers to participate in the educational program.

Here is how Schiavoni described the bill (then Senate Bill 298) at that time: “We need to make sure that online schools are accurately reporting attendance and not collecting tax dollars for students who never log in to take classes. Online schools must be held accountable for lax attendance policies. Without strong oversight, these schools could be collecting millions of dollars while failing to educate Ohio’s school children.” Schiavoni’s bill required e-schools to keep accurate records of the number of hours student spend doing coursework. It required online schools to notify the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) if a student failed to log-in for ten consecutive days. It required that a qualified teacher check in with each student once a month to monitor active participation. In the last legislative session, the bill was never fully debated and never brought to the Senate floor for a vote.

Schiavoni re-introduced the bill in February, and this afternoon at 3:15, Peggy Lehner, the chair of the Senate Education Committee, is finally holding a hearing on Schiavoni’s bill. When he testified in February about the bill he was introducing, Schiavoni explained why it is needed: “Other than the requirement that e-schools provide no less than 920 hours per year of learning opportunities, there are no specific statewide standards related to the number of hours per day or week that e-school students must be engaged in learning. In an environment where a teacher is not physically able to see students in a classroom, this lack of accountability is very concerning.”

Schiavoni believes Senate Bill 39 will address the outrageous problems at Ohio’s on-line charter schools: “Senate Bill 39 requires each e-school to keep an accurate record of how long each individual student is actively participating in learning in every 24-hour period. This information must be reported to ODE on a monthly basis, and ODE would be required to make this report available on their website. Senate Bill 39 would also require a teacher who is licensed by the Ohio Department of Education to certify the accuracy of student participation logs… on a monthly basis.”

Related posts

California: Court Decision Stuns Charter Industry and Threatens Stealth Charters

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Democrats in House Accelerate Hearings on Postal Service

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

New Mexico: Virtual Charter School Collects $6 Million for Students No Longer Enrolled

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Florida: Get Ready for Another Jeb Bush Charter Hoax

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Stephen Dyer: Ohio Charters Present a Picture of Incompetence, Ineffectiveness, and Malfeasance

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Jan Resseger: The Real Reason DeVos Tried to Fire the U.S. Department of Education Inspector General

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

If Hedge Funds Gobble Up the Free Press, Will Freedom of the Press Survive?

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Louisiana: The “Miracle School” That Was a Fraud

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Denis Smith: Charter Abuses in Ohio Are Proliferating

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Leave a Comment