Charter Schools Corporate Reformers District of Columbia Education Industry New Orleans Privatization Tennessee

Corporate Reformers Descend on Detroit to Pick Over the Ruins

Interesting essay samples and examples on: https://essays.io/dissertation-examples-samples/

Just when you thought it couldn’t get worse for Detroit, here come the stars of the corporate reform movement with advice to do more of what Detroit has been doing without success.

 

More than half the students are in charter schools, but Detroit doesn’t have enough, it seems. The lowest-performing schools were dumped into the woebegone “Education Achievement Authority,” under an emergency manager with dictatorial powers, but that didn’t go anywhere.

 

If Detroit can’t get its school problems solved, it won’t be for lack of quality advice from national education experts.

 

As city and state leaders seek to figure out how best to salvage Detroit Public Schools and improve performance across a complex network of school choices, top school reformers from around the country want a piece of the action, too.

 

Last week, Michael Petrilli, CEO of the D.C.-based Fordham Institute, and Eric Chan, a partner at the Charter School Growth Fund, were a few of the latest to drop in on Detroit. Excellent Schools Detroit, which is helping lead the conversation locally about improving all city schools, invited them to town to discuss how best to create the right environment for quality charter school growth.

 

The more insights, the merrier. Other cities have undergone major school turnarounds, and there are consistent guidelines for success. When asked what Detroit needs to do to start showing results for kids, Petrilli and Chan echoed similar ideas.

 

“Deal with low-performing schools, and encourage high-performers,” says Petrilli, whose organization works to raise the quality of U.S. schools. “There are concrete things we can do.”

 

The examples of success offered by Petrilli and Chan: New Orleans, the District of Columbia, and Memphis. Privatization is the answer. Neither Petrilli nor Chan has an idea about how to improve public education. Just privatize it. Get rid of it. Bring in high-quality “seats.”

 

Readers of this blog have read again and again that most charter schools in New Orleans are rated D or F schools by the state of Louisiana; D.C. continues to be one of the lowest performing districts in the nation, as judged by the NAEP; and Memphis is home to the all-charter Achievement School District, whose founder Chris Barbic promised would produce a dramatic turnaround in only five years. That turnaround has not happened. Not in  New Orleans, D.C., or Memphis.

 

Surely there must be better examples of success for corporate reform. Or are there?

 

 

 

 

Related posts

Breaking News: Outrage in Newark as Christie’s Superintendent Fires Principals for Opposing School Closings

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Gary Rubinstein on Tennessee’s “Underachievement District”

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Secretary Duncan: Skip This Conference

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Utah: Expose of Legislators Who Are Cashing in on the Charter Industry

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Bernie Endorses Steve Zimmer and Imelda Padilla

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

An Important New Film: “KILLING ED”

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Alan Singer: Why Is This Charter Management Company Still in Business?

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Podesta: how to help privatization movement

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

The Washington Post Endorses Vouchers

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Leave a Comment